How to Protect Playing Cards

Card games are very popular. In my case I enjoy playing bridge with friends. Many playing cards can be purchased relatively cheaply, but if you play cards a lot you might find yourself repeatedly purchasing new packs of cards.

Cheap cards might not break the bank to replace, but suppose someone has give you a nice, decorative, boxed set of cards. There are lots around, and these can cost anything from around $15 (£12). Still not a huge amount, but you wouldn’t want to keep paying to replace them and the gift might hold sentimental value as well.

You want to look after your cards properly so you can enjoy using them but give them the maximum life possible before having to replace them.

There are very simple ways of doing this.

First, make sure your hands are clean before handling the cards. Sticky children’s fingers (and sticky adult fingers) will quickly stop the cards from fanning out and make dealing and shuffling difficult. If you are a bridge player and are playing with friends, maybe hand round a packet of wet wipes after that all important break for tea and cakes.

Secondly, make sure you are careful when you place the cards back in their box at the end of a game. It only takes a few seconds to tap the cards gently back into place so they form a uniform stack with no stray cards poking out edges or corners. If you don’t do this and stuff an uneven deck of cards back in their box you will quickly damage the edges and corners, which again will make dealing and fanning the cards difficult.

Thirdly, try to keep your cards away from a damp atmosphere. Storing them in a damp cupboard, on a windowsill prone to condensation or in a damp cellar will cause them to warp and discolour, making them unplayable.

Fourthly, if cards do become sticky because sticky fingers handled them, try cleaning them gently with a damp cloth that has been wrung out. This will remove any stick residue from sweets or cakes.

Fifthly, something I’d not come across until I started researching this article, but I think I will be buying some. Fanning powder. Available for just a few pounds or dollars on a well known site named after a South American river. You apply a small amount of the power to the surface of the cards and this helps them to fan out and deal much more easily.

This will reduce rough handling if players are having difficulty with fanning out sticky cards. It will also help players with reduced dexterity by making it easier to sort and handle their cards.

I did see it suggested that a small amount of talcum powder might have a similar effect. I think I’m going to try that one, too.

Sixthly. Handle your cards with care when they are in their boxes. Throwing them in a cupboard, dropping them on the floor, or wedging them at an angle between other heavy objects will damage the box and put pressure on the cards, causing them to distort.

Looking after your cards only takes a little care, but will pay dividends in lower replacement costs.

Card Games Versus Computer Games

The memories flood back of learning to play games such as euchre and 500 as children and the hours we spent doing the same as we grew up. The fascination such held for me was as a lesson in maths each time we played. Later when at University many of the students would collect around the tables in the student’s quarters and cards were always on the agenda.

What fun we all had and the challenges were exciting. Now, however, there is hardly anyone playing cards because computer and Xbox games have taken over in many homes. My young grandchildren spend hours in front of the television with a joystick in their hands doing stuff that has no intellectual advantage. Even adults have their enjoyment with the things they can do on a computer instead of around a table with the family.

In recent years my endeavours have stretched to Bridge and also playing 500 at the local clubs, which run sessions on week-nights. It is interesting to see how many of the oldies, like me, enjoy the night out and how competitive such endeavours can be.

The brain needs stimulation as one ages and there is no better way to exercise it than by having to think your way to a win in a card game. Isn’t that something young people will get benefits from as well? While my generation grew up in a different world where television and computers had not yet been invented my kids now think they are smarter because they can outdo me on the computer. If only they knew what they are missing out on.

How to Use Statistics in Playing Cards

Millions of people enjoy playing bridge and millions of players understand the basic rules of the game. They practice and play every day. Many reach a certain level of expertise and then plateau. Their game stops improving.

What’s responsible for this plateau? For many the answer is statistics. Or to be more accurate, a lack of understanding or knowledge of how to use statistics when you are playing.

What do statistics have to do with playing bridge, I hear you ask? The answer is “a lot”. They can be, and often are, the barrier to becoming a better bridge player.

Let’s assume, for example, that you are declarer. Once the opponents have made their opening lead dummy’s hand is exposed for all to see. You know which cards you hold and which cards dummy holds.

Now assume that you are playing a trump contract. Dummy holds 5 cards in trumps and you hold 4, a total of 9 cards. That means that your opponents hold 4 trump cards between them.

You need to plan your play. Depending on which cards you hold in trumps you may need to try and work out how the trumps are split between the opponents. A 4-0 split may mean the game plays very differently from the way it would play if there was a 2-2 split.

You can’t know for certain how the cards split in any given situation, but you can use statistics to give you a better chance. Then you can play for the most likely scenario – the percentage play. This won’t always work, but over a number of games it will give you the better chance of winning more games.

As you might imagine, there are a lot of statistics associated with playing bridge. The best players will have memorised and will use all of them. Those of us who are more modest, home or club players will just remember a few – the ones that we think will be most useful to us and that we will be able to understand use.

So, back to our trump split. While we are planning our play it may seem to us that a 4-0 trump split between the opponents will need us to play differently from a 2-2 split, or a 3-1 split. We can’t know how they split and we might not be able to plan for all 3 scenarios. So which should we choose as the most likely?

Statistics tell us that the probability of a 4-0 split is 10%. However, the provability of a 2-2 split is 40% and the probability of a 3-1 split is 50%. It probably doesn’t make sense to plan for a 4-0 split – although if it becomes obvious early on that the cards split that way, you will want to rethink your plan.

In a scenario where a 4-0 split could have a major effect on the number of tricks you win, you may feel that you want to test the split early on in the game by drawing a round of trumps (or whichever suit is of concern). If one of the opponents shows out in the first round, then you know you are up against a 4-0 split and can replan your play.

If testing the split isn’t possible, then you will probably want to make the percentage play and hope your approach pays off.

If there are 5 cards missing from a suit, the percentage chances change. The probability of a 5-0 split is just 4% (and the opponents may have helped you work out if that is likely to be the case by bidding that suit). The probability of a 4-1 split is 28%, but the probability of a 3-2 split is 68%. You will probably want to make your initial plan on the assumption of a 3-2 split.

Planning your play is an essential skill, and knowing some basic statistics will help you plan. But bridge is a dynamic game and you need to be prepared to rethink your plan if the opponents wrong foot you, or the statistics don’t work in your favor.